Oct 10, 2012

Persepolis (Parsa or Takht-e Jamshid), Naqsh-e Rostam, Pasargad(-ae), Tele Bakum are falsely invented names

The periodical terms to specify the development of the human culture in Near East are less precise.
It is convenient to call the various phases after the name of the sites that first represented best its old civilization. The well-known Kurdu, Jamdat Nasr, Uruk, Uruk-Warka, Xalaf (Halaf), Ubaid, Eridu, Ur, Susa I, Susa II (Acropolis) or Susa of Elam and Uruk of Sumer etc. are corrupt names and not real periods, but adopted and used in widely different applications. Susa “the Šuš” itself is the real site name of an archaeological site.

The now well-known sites Persepolis (Parsa or Takht-e Jamshid), Naqsh-e Rostam, Pasargad(-ae), Tele Bakum are falsely invented names by the scholars from western universities for the ruins which are obviously specified as Elamite sites.

Herzfeld says: in 1928, I started excavations at a place discovered in 1923, only about two miles from the terrace of Persepolis, an insignificant oval mound covering about 750 to 1000 feet, of no greater elevation than twelve feet. It had no name, and it is enough to call it Persepolis. (Note 8) At a legal contest concerning the ownership, it was ascertained that the mound had no name. Tol e Bakum, the name recently given it by the Persepolis expedition, must be a newly created one. (Tol should be tel “mound”), see Babel (Babylon) is Bible: Bible Discovered 2nd Edi.

Hamiit Qliji Berai